Anna's Hummingbird

From All Birds Wiki

Other names[edit]

Description[edit]

Anna's Hummingbirds are, of course, small birds (3.9 to 4.3 inches/10-11 cm long). The males have iridescent light crimson crown, and bronze-green and grey plumage. Some outer feathers have white tips. The females and juveniles lack the iridescent crown, instead having a dull green crown. They have some red markings along their grey throats.1 All have iridescent bronze-green plumage on their backs.

Similar species[edit]

Some people confuse the male Anna's Hummingbird with the better known Ruby-throated Hummingbird due to their very similarly coloured plumage.


Behaviour[edit]

Male Anna's are very territorial, attacking larger birds (including geese and eagles) that pass through it's territory. (A male Anna's was once found dead by a hunter, tangled in the feathers of the Canada Goose it had attacked.) They will divebomb people and other hummingbirds who are near their primary food source, making a "booming" sound with their tail feathers as they do to drive them off. They also make this noise during their mating ritual, in which they will fly up to 130 m in the air and dive straight down.

Diet[edit]

Anna's Hummingbirds eat nectar, flying insects, and spiders, and have been seen to consume tree sap on occasion.

Calls[edit]

A squeaky, high pitched looping "bzz bzz, bzz bzz, bzz bzz, bweee" call is a variant of their primary call.2

Reproduction[edit]

Distribution/habitat[edit]

Anna's tend to live along the Pacific coast of North America, from British Columbia down to Arizona.

References[edit]

1.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna's_Hummingbird 2.http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/annas_hummingbird/sounds

External links[edit]

Projects

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File:Paw 1.png This article is part of Project Aves, a All Birds project that aims to write comprehensive articles on each bird, including made-up species.
This article is part of Project Apodiformes, a All Birds project that aims to write comprehensive articles on each hummingbird, swift and tree swift, including made-up species.
File:Trochilidae diversity.png This article is part of Project Trochilidae, a All Birds project that aims to write comprehensive articles on each hummingbird, including made-up species.